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with johnson in a cabinet meeting on vietnam. >> only days in the new administration, the vietcong attacked an american base and johnson called a cabinet meeting to sanction the bombing of north vietnam. >> johnson was not looking for advice but validation and it was actually johnson looking for ratification of what he'd already decided. he goes around the room asking all these people, his advisors to tell them what they think about this decision to launch these attacks and humphrey announces he thinks it's a mistake. >> johnson was furious with him. and the bombing of the north began. >> congress gave us this authority, and all this, 1964 to do whatever may be necessary. that's pretty far-reaching. the sky's the limit. >> while there may have been no limits on johnson's expansion of the vietnam war, there would now be limits on his vice president. >> i knew him intentionally of those years of the 1960's and that was the most tortured period of his life, trying to be vice president, serving the president who was taking us to war in vietnam, even if he had misgivings as an independent thinke
of vietnam for several months in 1968-1969. major general hunt former chief of staff of the 9th infantry division recalls the divisions mission and details plans that were used to combat guerrilla warfare. he presents his book at the 2010 association of the u.s. army meeting held at the washington convention center in washington, d.c.. >> thank you for coming. in my book, the sort out the ninth division by employ all sorts of intelligence coupled aggressive innovative operations was able to compete in combat operations. that also include examples of the bravery and dedication of the ninth division soldiers. the ninth division is operations research, we concentrate on obtaining results, the key is results, of all activity. each activity had a result. so the ratio then of the input to the output were normally measurable and we use those and then to measure how effective we would be. the war in vietnam was always about lands and people. the north vietnamese and all other papers that we want to have land and people. the government of vietnam, south vietnam water land and people to maintain t
understandable. >> maybe a couple of questions from the audience. one is from iraq and vietnam. is that a fair comparison? >> there are similarities and notable differences between the two. said vietnamese were not likely to come and attack the united states of america. the terrorist threat to, the dangers in iraq was on the terrorist list, that was a very real threat to our country and al qaeda had demonstrated that it would attack america. now there was no direct link between al qaeda and iraq certainly between afghanistan and iraq and iraq was on the terrorist list and had a pattern of having developed weapons of mass destruction so there were these things that affected it. but i would say that the differences were greater than the similarities but there were certainly similarities. >> host: in the case of johnson we both know people who worked for johnson and one thing they say the tough thing is when somebody says i lost my son in vietnam. why did he die? what do you say for iraq? >> it is the hardest thing if you are in a position of responsibility when a conflict occurs. says we would g
, south vietnam and south korea. in 1979, he served on the national security council staff for the president. and in 1982, he served as the national security advisor for then-vice president george h.w. bush. in 1989, he was appointed as ambassador to south korea where he served until 1993. after which he left government service and took on the position as chairman of the korea society. he currently holds the position of chairman emeritus of the korea society. don gregg has been here many times in my time here giving electric tours, classes in our winter study term. i've met him on several occasions. but there's two things i learned just recently about him. one of which shows us the true breadth of his accomplishment in foreign policy and international relations. it turns out in a 1995 book by tom clancy called "opp center," there is a character, the ambassador of the south korea character, fictionalized to be sure but nonetheless that character's name is known as gregory donald. [laughter] >> and, in fact, it's believed that it's based loosely on our own donald gregg. and i
returning from vietnam, these veterans are turning to their support -- or turning their support, rather, to a situation. lindsey mastis has the story. >> reporter: veterans exposed to agent orange in vietnam say that because of what happened to them they are convinced that testing done here in frederick is causing health problems. the army corps of engineers is meet this right now in the hotel behind me. they say agent orange was created and carefully test but veterans say they don't trust the report. >> i trusted them. >> reporter: they line up along the road holding signs demanding answers. these veterans say they were exposed to agent orange in vietnam and some have serious health problems because of it. >> having some liver problems. kidney problems. and lung problems. i also have a deteriorating auto immune system. >> reporter: in vietnam they were exposed to it directly. >> we walked through it. it was a dusty environment. >> reporter: here in frederick no one knew agent orange was sprayed until recently according to this preliminary report put together by the army corps of engine
done in world war ii, his older brother had done in vietnam, his father-in-law had done in vietnam, his nephew had done in afghanistan, and his brother-in-law has done in iraq. he stood on the wall to tell his country, "sleep peacefully at night because this man stands ready to do the violence and things necessary to protect you ." [applause] on this day, 50 years later, this son of america stands before you on this grand stage committing himself to his country, to its national character, to its fiscal and national security, to the preservation of the life, liberty, and pursuit of happiness of every american. i do it for my wife, my daughters, my relatives, my friends. i do it for the men and women in uniform. i do it for the little boy and little girl wearing a high school junior rotc uniform just like i did. i do it for the unborn american child. i do it for each and every one of your who hear my words. i do it by pledging sacred honor to the dawn of a new america. to the liberal threats i know will be putting out pieces attacking me starting today and of course on monday, continue yo
force and the aid she provided for many who were wounded during a battle in vietnam. she discusses her book at the an usual association of the u.s. army meeting. the program is about an hour. >> i've got to begin in washington after so many years. the first time it was in 1954 when president eisenhower gave me the medal of liberty and honored those of the battle of dien bien phu i who gave their life to save vietnam from the the communists. when i was asked, i could not refuse, and i wrote a book which has been translated by -- [inaudible] and is published by the association of the u.s. army. i spent three months in indochina in 1953 and six months in 1954 as a flight nurse who specialized in -- [inaudible] because the air transport may need special care. dien bien phu was -- [inaudible] my position were established on the -- [inaudible] gabrielle and be dominique to the east, francois and claudine to the west and, finally, -- [inaudible] isabelle -- [inaudible] hospital that was -- [inaudible] with a surgeon and seven male nurses. in january a second surgeon and male nurses team were
the briefing by lyndon johnson on the vietnam. tell a little bit about that because you actually spoke up in that briefing in a way that i think very few people did. >> well, this wonderful hubert humphrey was called the hefty warrior and just a wonderfully energetic and appealing person, he was vice president and had just come back from vietnam, and vietnam was increasingly becoming a major political factor in the country. it had not then when i first ran in 62 but by then i suppose it was 64, 66 -- 65. >> mabey 66. >> so president johnson was getting complaints that members of congress didn't feel they were being informed about the war. >> however the hid said such a thing. >> he invited the members of congress to the white house and we all went down, at least a large number, 150 of us coming and it was winter as i recall. the invitation came late and we went in and it is nothing for young congressman to be sitting in the white house getting briefed by the president and vice president just back from vietnam, and he would humphrey started to give the briefing and lyndon johnson was comma
are very vocal about cancer cluster concerns. joining in their fight, vietnam veterans with a message of their own. bob barnard is working this one tonight, bob. >> reporter: the spot light is shining a bit brighter tonight on the possible link between the secretive work once done at frederick's fort detrick and cancer rates among people living close to the base. a handful of vietnam veterans staged a silent protest outside the gates of fort detrick this afternoon, home to the army's herbicidal warfare programs, including the controversial defoliant, agent orange, in the 1960s. >> this was ground zero, if you will, for what has happened to a whole generation of american veterans who fought in vietnam and our families. >> reporter: and to generations of families living near fort detrick, cousins bill and james cranes, who cite cancer rates alarmingly and unnaturally high. >> his mother died with colon cancer, my dad died with pancreatic cancer and my sister died of brain cancer and my wife just died in the last couple of months with ovarian cancer. >> reporter: cran says area b was onc
. also on the program -- a cruise vote sinks in vietnam, killing 12 foreign tourists. questions about the industry's safety record. solar power. a son of leashes' one of its biggest recorded flares. we will talk to a scientist monitoring this extraordinary force of nature. it is midday here in london, 6:00 p.m. in delhi and three in afternoon in the bahraini capital where three people were killed and hundreds injured after security forces stormed a protest in canada and the city center during wednesday night. the hard-line response, presumably ordered by the ruling family is in stark contrast to the reaction of security forces in the egypt with president mubarak was toppled last week. first, this update of developments from mike aldridge. >> the police moved in without warning around 3:00 in the morning local time, storming into the square where hundreds of people were spending the night in tents. it they fired tear gas, and according to witnesses, rubber bullets. the interior ministry said the security forces were clearing the square after exhausting all chance of dialogue with the p
palace. an investigation is underway in vietnam where a tourist bus sunk, killing 12 people. at least 11 foreigners and the vietnamese tour guide are among the dead. >> they protruding mask marks the spot, a point for the rescue divers to aim for. the grim task is to search the wreck that now lies beneath and to retrieve the bodies of those who went down with the boat. 12 people perished in these waters, mostly foreign tourists. one by one, they are brought to the surface, gently laid ashore, then taken to be formally identified. the disaster remains a mystery. the sea was calm. the investigation is already under way and inevitable questions about safety standards on vietnam's tors boats. but there are no answers to comfort the grieving. survivors still struggle to comprehend their escape. >> i went out and they called me. c'mon, c'mon, there's something wrong here. the book is going down. we jumped from the boat. we started swimming to the next boat. at that time, one boat rescued as pierre >> the day is one of vietnam's most popular tourist spots. the stunning beauty of its strange roc
a variety of different posts in different countries, including burma, japan, south vietnam and south korea. in 1979 he served on a national security council staff for the president. and in 1982 he served as the national security advisor for then vice president george h.w. bush. in 1989 he was appointed as ambassador to south korea where he served until 1993. after which, he left government service and took on the position as chairman of the korea society. he currently holds a position of chairman emeritus of the korea society. donald gregg is a great friend and son of williams college. he has been here many times in my time here, given lectures, classes in our winter study term. i've met him on several occasions but there's two things i learned just recently about him. one of which shows us the true breadth of his accomplishment in foreign policy and international relations. it turns out that in a 1995 book by tom clancy called, "ops center". there is a character, ambassador of south korea character, fictionalized to be sure. but that character is named gregory donald. in fact it is believ
it was that they was problemed with, and the biggest problem among them was our involvement in vietnam. and they said, "if you're a good guy, you don't get sent . you get sent to vietnam. if you're a bad guy, you have a little stigma against you and you don't go to vietnam. " not that they did not love the country, but they didn't want us to be involved there. it was a dishonorable war and it was an unwinnable war. so when i raised my hand and told mrs. johnson what those boys had told me and also how i felt about our involvement in vietnam, it seems that within two hours i was out of work in the united states, according to my dossier that was given to me not just . not the whole thing, just a smidgen. it said that i was on the cia list in the united states of america. q: now you spoke up during a . a discussion that was largely devoted to the beautification of america. ek: well, her idea, and according to the ladies there, too, was to plant wild seeds along route 66. (laughter) ek: and i thought, that's all very well and good. but what we need is education for everyone, equal education for all, and why is it
held a variety of different posts in different countries including burma, japan, south vietnam, and south korea. in 1979, he served on the national security counsel staff for the president, and in 1982, he served as the national security adviser for then vice president george hw bush. in 1989, he was appointed as ambassador to south korea where he served until 1993 after which he left government service and took on the position of chairman of the korea society, and he currently holds the position of chairman amaretis of the society. don't is a great friend and son of the williams college. he's been here many times giving lectures and classes. i've met him on several occasions, but there two things i learned just recently about him, one of which shows us the true breath of his accomplishments in foreign policy and international relations. it turns out that in a 1995 book by tom clancy called "opt center" there is a character and nevertheless that name of the character is gregory donald and it's believed to be based losely on our own donald greg. i learned his middle name is finn
the end of the war. they're not mobilizing the way people were mobilized against the vietnam war. i think for some fairly clear reasons, not just the draft, which is always used as the explanation for why -- i always thought and i argue in the book that's not a very good explanation for why there is not a stronger antiwar movement today. .. >> the antiwar movement in the vietnam era proved out of two decades of the most sensational economic growth anybody had ever seen, which raised expectations across the board and made young people in particular believe that they were entitled to a better life than going to fight in the jungle for a cause they didn't understand. now people are worried about jobs, about what their next, where their next neil is coming from. it's a different second fear. the fear engendered by the 9/11 attacks are horrific trauma is still with us. and fearful people are also much more easily whipped into line, or easily induced to believe that they are in danger by forces that the government points out, points act as endangering forces. little by little it seems that trau
war, not the vietnam war, that the incursion with president clinton. >> does of war declaration make any difference? would it have brought americans more into this? >> i doubt it. i think that, you never know. that is a road that they did not travel, and i can't really say. i think the resolution passed by congress and then the resolution by the united nations provided an underpinning. the other thing that i would add is that president bush and colin powell and the vice-president discussed the hope that there would not be a conflict and that saddam hussein would be persuaded to leave the country and not require an invasion of the country. there were messages pasts and request made. they were rebuffed. at think that saddam hussein very likely was purposefully trying to make the world believe he had blogs stockpiles. i think that he felt he had friends in the united nations it might be able to stop the united kingdom, united states and various other countries supporting the coalition and prevent them from going in. i also think that because president george w. bush, his father had gone
. and you talk about vietnam. and i'm wondering, do you see any lessons from, from the vietnam war that we can apply -- >> i think there are some real lessons, and that is you don't back away from commitments you make under domestic pressure, political pressure. if you do, you invite all kinds of problems in the years to follow. in vietnam -- this has nothing to do with how you get into an engagement once involved. you have essential interests to protect those you went many to serve. you went in to serve. we ended up signing the paris accords. in the paris accords -- and incidentally, we got a hot of people to go -- lot of people to go in with us. in reliance on american determination, american strength and the belief that the united states would accomplish its goals. towards the end all american troops were brought out of vietnam. we signed the paris accords which were supposed to settle the war. and in those accords undertook the obligation to keep the south vietnamese military supplied sufficiently to offset onslaughts from the north. the communist bloc continued to pour in weapons and
in and says i lost my son in vietnam, why did he die? what would you say for iraq? >> it is the hardest thing. i think anyone who isn't position of responsibility, when a conflict occurs and you, as joyce and i would go to the hospital, he those lives were changed forever. meet with her family and meet with the families of those who were killed, we would think to ourselves, we are going in, what is it that we could say or do to help them understand the appreciation that we and america share for the sacrifice, the individual sacrifices and the sacrifices of families as well, he does they sacrifice and they serve. and we would come out of those meetings almost invariably inspired, not feeling that we help them, but feeling that they have helped us. the pride they have in their service, the cohesion they deal with the units they were in, their desire to get back, you just could not fail to come out of those meetings inspired by the young men and women. the big difference between the vietnam war and the conflicts today is that, thanks to milton friedman and richard nixon and the congress, we have
're not mobilized in the way people were mobilized against the vietnam war. i think for some fairly clear reasons, not just the draft which is always used as the explanation for why -- always thought that was not, and i argue in the book that that's not a very good explanation for why there is not a stronger anti-war movement today. you know, there was a draft in world war ii, and there was no anti-war movement to speak of at all. there was a draft in korea which was a war that got extremely unpopular. and even so and was ended finally by president eisenhower, even so there was no anti-war movement to speak of at all. so it's not simply the question of whether you have a draft or you don't have a draft although having a draft certainly makes anti-war activity more feasible or easier. it also, it seems to me, has to do with things like an economic growth or economic recession. the anti-war movement in the vietnam era grew out of two decades of the most sensational economic growth anybody had ever seen which raised expectations across the board and made young people in particular believe that they
. >> remember, how much fun we had building that book shelf together? >> that was my vietnam. and i was in vietnam. >> oh, look at us, three construction dudes. dad, i'm going to get you workman gloves, blue or camel, what's your preference? >> surprise me. tavis: you are the most diverse head of the household. your family is all over the place. >> yeah. tavis: you are diversity. >> that's right. tavis: what do you make of this character and all the different pieces of his family's puzzle? >> when i first started trying to do it, i was concerned, you know, i thought, i don't know how to play this guy. i didn't know how that relationship would work with my wife, the clomian, i didn't know if anybody would buy that. this is perfect casting. and then again, at this stage, i'm 64. i really don't even know how to play it. i don't know how to be 64. it seems odd to be this old. it's almost i'm out there on my own now. when you are in your 30's, you sort of know what's appropriate. you know how to live. so, that carries over into the world and i don't know what's appropriate half the time.
reporting. >>> in fresno, thousands of moreners paid respect to a key u.s. ally in the vietnam war and a hero in the community. during the vietnam war general pow lead them in a cia-backed battle against communists. they were credited with reset lig in the american cities including fresno. he died at age 81 after battling pneumonia. today's elaborate ceremony was muted by news the army vowed to bury him in the arlington national cemetery. >> we are very humble. we are not going to get angry like that, but we will be feeling betrayed. >> it is not clear where his remains will be laid to rest at the end of the 6th day funeral. >>> oakland's police chief says he is staying on the job despite some frustration about budget problems that are making his work more difficult. his future has been in doubt since he said he was applying for the chief's job in san jose, a position he did to the get. today he joined the oakland mayor. >> the bottom line, the reason they came to the city is to make a difference. the community responded and asked me to stand by them. that's what touched my heart.
in vietnam where a tourist boat has sunk, killing 12 people. it was near a popular tourist destination. 11 foreigners and a tourist guide are among the dead. >> a protruding massed marks the spot. the grim task is to search the wreckage that lies beneath and to retrieve the bodies of those who went down with the boat. 12 people perished in these waters. most were foreign tourists. one by one, they are brought to the surface, gently laid ashore, and then taken to be formally identified. because of the disaster remains a mystery. and there was no warning, no clue of what was to come. to the investigation is already underway, and inevitable questions about safety standards on vietnamese tourist boats. but there are no answers to comfort the grieving. survivors still struggle to comprehend their escape. >> i thought there was something wrong here. the boat is going down. we jumped from the but then started swimming to the next boat. that but rescued us. >> this is one of the vietnam's most popular tourist spots. the stunning beauty attracts people from around the world. that beauty is now dimm
at what the russian speaker. then we decided to fight the vietnam -- vietnam war. chiang kai shek considered mongolia as part of china. i was sent to the russian desk at the russian speaker was said to hong kong. that you had experience in russia. >> that got me into the soviet field. >> what should we know as a -- what should we m should weongolia. >> it is a country that conquered much of the world back 600 years ago. since it did it, basically it is a large rural country with about 20 times as many sheep as people. historically they work nomadic hearders and also had rich mineral deposits. the existing thing is when they came out from the soviet yoke -- although the russians did pour investment into mongolia. the mongols were able to make a transition to a democratic form of government. >> what got you into the foreign service? >> you begin to worry if your junior year what you are going to do. i started it -- . the switch to history when i realized the other the did. the students had more natural at a dance. i was interested in foreign countries. then we had a state departmen
in congress during the vietnam war and during the civil rights marches and when the city of washington, d.c was in flames after martin luther king was killed. they will get a sense of the fact that president lyndon johnson could barely use the white house because of the demonstrators against the war in vietnam. we all have a tendency to think of the times we are living in a somewhat unique and distinctive, and of course, they are different. in my 78 years, i have seen an awful lot of turmoil in the country and difficulties in the country. i must say i also hope that people will read this and see how important the all volunteer military has been. if you think about it, back in the 1960's, before president nixon and milton friedman and a whole group of people had pushed for a volunteer army, and president nixon managed to get it through the congress. before that, there were people serving who did not want to serve and our military. everyone there today is there because they want to be. the mood in the country is so different as a result of that. compared to the vietnam war, what is going on
their illnesses on fort dietrich and other vietnam war toxins for years. >> we have research that there is a cover-up. >> his ex-wife and daughter both died of cancer said experts hired by his foundation have confirmed a link. >> the experts can back and said, the footprints from the dioxins through the blood samples that we did honor victims -- gone are the victims lead back to fort dietrich. >> but they have the remediation project underway. so far, officials have not shown any definite links. they also say that they are trying to better research, but is hampered by the fact that those records are scattered and lost. there is a hearing this thursday at the state senate on a new bill that would require environmental testing and cancer studies. there is another peaceful demonstration planned by veterans and resident tomorrow. >>> coming up, a growing wave of pro labor demonstrations spreading throughout the midwest plant in our area. >> new indications of top u.s. officials appointed by president obama may try to take his job. >> our first lady does not project the image of women that you might se
in vietnam with the 864th combat engineers. he was in the tet offensive. but this. >> to seep this. this is -- this is disgusting. >> this is how the san hope say war memorial once looked. thick glass, engraved with a tribute to those who served.dald now the wall is covered with plywood, no money for repairs. >> it is awful. visiting the wall in washington, d.c. with a cup buddies. that was emotional. >> yeah, yeah. [ inaudible ] >> in fact, more than 40 years later the pain hasn't gone away. he still sees a counselor and he says this, this doesn't help. >> this doesn't help any. it's saddening. it hurts. how could you not call it disgusting. >> andrew bales was project manager and he voups svows to rebuild. this time they will add an insurance policy and surveillance camcameras. >> you are going up against a bad set of dudes. you know weep put the cameras out here. don't come back. don't come back at all. >> not if you want to answer to them. you can call if you think you can lend a hand. there is no timetable on when the repashz wiirs will be made. >> thank you, damian. sad to s
was protesting the war in vietnam. i was arrested on the steps of the capitol, and i went to jail for that. and there was another incident there in a protest against the war in vietnam. i was also arrested on an airplane for using a cell phone, but we won't talk about that. that was a terrible shock. i considered it, in a sense, a freedom of expression issue, but i don't think that they did. but i have had incidents where i've protested, where i've been involved with large protests ever since i was a kid. my father was in the radio business, and i'm not sure how he got away with saying a lot of the things that he said. he was very much not in favor of the blacklisting that went on during the mccarthy era, and he spent a lot of time on the radio talking about it. so i was raised in a family where we talked about issues. we talked about the french in indochina. we talked about mccarthy. and i was taken along to a lot of civic situations and public situations where the issue of freedom of speech and the first amendment were--were predominant and very much talked about in my home. so i was rai
in vietnam, i didn't spend a lot of time thinking about these things, i must admit. i was a soldier, a young infantry staff sergeant. i went through the wet flatlands, primarily covered in rice pat tees, beyond the waves of the south china sea. i do think back, and i do recall during that time, that every day i saw villagers emerge from small huts, dirt floors, men, wirge and children, who headed out to those rice patties at dawn and came back at dusk, not five days a week, seven days a week. i could not help but wonder, what if there were more peace corps volunteers around? what if there were some doctors here to help? what if somehow the government was connected to a land grant school or agricultural university? how about if they had some modern farming equipment? what all or any of that could have done to help them, not just to survive, but to flourish. the images of war in its many forms has stayed with me, but watching those villagers bring dignity to a threadbare existence amid the very vulnerable landscape of war is an image that all these years later does make me think of america's p
and some decisions made during the vietnam war. this event is just over one hour. let me recognize the organizations that ranged tonight's talk. the stanley kaplan program on american policy, the leadership studies program, and the international studies program, all from here at williams college. donald gregg is a member of the class of 1951 of williams college. he was a philosophy major. when he left, he graduated in 1951, he joined the central intelligence agency and started a career that lasted 30 years -- 32 years. he has held a variety of different posts in different countries, including burma, japan, south vietnam, and south korea. in 1979, he served of national security council staff for the president and 1982, he served as a national security adviser for then vice-president george h. w. bush. in 1989, he was appointed as ambassador to south korea where he served until 1993. after which, he left government service and took on the position as chairman of the korea society. he currently holds a position of chairman emeritus of the korea society. donald gregg is a great friend
in north vietnam, the vietnamese went to great lengths to restrict the news from home to the statements and activities of prominent opponents of the war in vietnam. they wanted us to believe that america had forgotten us. they never mentioned ronald reagan to us or played his speeches over the camp loud speakers. no matter. we knew about him. new additions to our ranks told us how the governor and mrs. reagan were committed to our liberation and our cause. when we came home, all of us were eager to meet the reagans, to thank them for their concern. but more than gratitude drew us to them. we were drawn to them because they were among the few prominent americans who didn't subscribe to the then-fashionable notion that america had entered her inevitable decline. we prisoners of war came home to a country that had lost a war and the best sense of itself, a county beset by social and economic problems. assassinations, riots, scandals, contempt for political, religious and educational institutions gave the appearance that we had become a dysfunctional society. patriotism was sneered at. the
as a nation. when i was a prisoner of war in north vietnam, the vietnamese went to great lengths to restrict the news from home to the statements and activities of prominent opponents of the war in vietnam. they wanted us to believe that america had forgotten us. they never mentioned ronald reagan to us or played his speeches over the camp loud speakers. no matter. we knew about him. new additions to our ranks told us how the governor and mrs. reagan were committed to our liberation and our cause. when we came home, all of us were eager to meet the reagans, to thank them for their concern. but more than gratitude drew us to them. we were drawn to them because they were among the few prominent americans who didn't subscribe to the then-fashionable notion that america had entered her inevitable decline. we prisoners of war came home to a country that had lost a war and the best sense of itself, a county beset by social and economic problems. assassinations, riots, scandals, contempt for political, religious and educational institutions gave the appearance that we had become a dysfunctional soc
to the vietnam war. steve king will explain what he is talking about, when he joins us next. bill: also, imagine owning 200 -- owing, rather, $200,000 on your mortgage when your home is worth $100,000. staggering numbers from sin city and the rest of the country, upside down in america. bill: horrible crash in northern mississippi. three are dead after an accident there involving two buses. filled are high school students. and an 18 wheel tractor trailer, calvin county, south of the tennessee border, where a truck sideswiped one school buses and collided head-on with the other. two teachers and the truck driver were killed. when firefighters reached the scene, they had feared the worst. >> i come around, that's when i noticed the school bus. scared me at first. the first bus got sideswiped, the second bus got hit head on with the 18 wheeler. bill: a dozen students were hurt, dozens medevaced from the scene, and boy, what a scene it was. martha: boy. >> ♪ >> ♪ blinded me with science. >> ♪ >> ♪ martha: i saw this this morning, when i saw that ipad. so does it seem like every time you get
on in joe lieberman's mind. as was done with william rogers in the 1970's about vietnam, he was picking up information, and in some cases, knew more than the witness about what he was asking. i want to find out about this war and what is going on. i do not want to know joe lieberman's political opinion on it. i will send him a letter if they want to get a speech from him. >> another senator, let's watch what he does, and, again, what is wrong with this? >> general, we all on the committee understand that this is an important time in afghanistan, and i think it would be useful to consider president karzai a reliable partner. it is sometimes hard to understand what he says versus what he does, and vice versa. i have some questions in that regard. how do you explain what is his mercurial personality? one day, he talks about the taliban, and the next day, he goes down to kandahar. i knew one person i have great respect for, and what do you think his departure might mean? maybe even crucial police training effort? >> thanks, senator. on the first question -- >> well, what is wrong? >> he is ask
we did right after vietnam or right after world war ii. warfare is fundamentally changed. in world war ii if you were wounded, my grandfather only had one in three chance of making it out alive and by my father's generation, in vietnam if you were wounded it had gone slightly better but not much. one in four chance of living from your wounds. now it has improved so vastly that the last numbers were one in 20 and it may be a lot better than that. not all we that but because of body armor there are a lot of people who are never injured in the first place. we have many more people who have seen combat and are walking amongst us seemingly without a scratch, they may have been in several firefights the digital they may have even been shot and not have a scar and yet the human psyche has not changed for several thousand years so you carry the burden. more of us are around to carry them. >> i am active duty and it is an interesting phenomenon that if you compare this to other wars i could be in a firefight and a home within 18 to 24 hours. if you compared to previous conflicts in particul
to follow. in vietnam, this has nothing to do how you get into an engagement once involved. you have an essential interest to protect ours and those you went in to, to serve. we ended up assigning the paris accords. and incidentally we got a lot of people to go in with us in reliance on american determination, american strength and american -- the police chief that the united states would accomplish its goals. towards the end, all american troops were brought out of vietnam, they sign the paris accords which was supposed to settle the war. and in those accords we undertook the obligation to keep the south vietnamese military supplied sufficiently to offset onslaughts from the north. the communist bloc continued to pour in weapons and highly sophisticated ones into the north. and at a certain point the congress voted to not send another nickel to vietnam. at the time, incidentally, the south vietnamese were doing a very good job not only holding their ground but even gaining some ground but once they couldn't have the fuel to run the tanks and planes and couldn't buy more ammunition,
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